Melbourne Plastic Surgery Blog

Melbourne Plastic Surgery Blog

Breast Implant Study

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

On 11/11/14 The Herald Sun Newspaper reported on a recent breast implant study - linking breast implants to breast cancer.  

 The Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons have issued the following media release in response to this study:


 

Interplast visit to Bhutan

Monday, September 22, 2014
Mr Mutimer recently travelled to Bhutan as part of a needs assessment team for Interplast.  Landing at the worlds 4th most dangerous airport made for some nervous flying but the team thankfully landed safely. Interplast currently do not run any programs in Bhutan, so the purpose of the trip was to establish whether an Interplast program would be useful.

Bhutan has expressed an interest in having an Interplast program in their country, not only for the valuable and life-changing operative procedures Interplast perform, but to take advantage of the teachings and knowledge to be learned from Interplast Surgeons, ensuring that the medical community of Bhutan can manage and sustain the work of Interplast, long after they are gone.  The plan would be to upskill doctors, nurses and allied health staff in reconstructive plastic surgery. Hospitals in Bhutan are quite well set up but the services offered are very basic in comparison to Australia.

Many other organizations have “camps” which fly in, operate and fly out but Bhutan is looking for training so that their doctors have the capacity to manage injuries throughout the year, not just when international help is present.

Interplast would likely initially assist with hand surgery and small general plastic surgery.  There is a strong need for both of these sustainable, entry level surgeries. Mr Mutimer witnessed a patient who had been mauled by a bear whilst picking mushrooms in a field - so it goes without saying that the presenting cases in Bhutan would be quite varied compared to most of the cases Mr Mutimer treats in Australia.

No visit to a country like Bhutan is complete without sampling the local fare - Keith found the food fascinating, extremely colourful and very different to Australian cuisine. He was taken out for dinner by a group of local doctors to an Italian restaurant who proceeded to run out of cheese. The solution? Close the restaurant! Not one to go hungry the group decided instead to dine on much enjoyed local fare.  Keith found Bhutan a beautiful country with magnificent countryside (a hikers dream) - he hopes to return one day to hike and explore the country further.

For more information on Interplast visit: https://www.interplast.org.au



Melbourne Rebels Rugby Union Team

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Mr Mutimer regularly volunteers as a Plastic Surgeon with the Melbourne Rebels, attending their home games at AAMI Park. He also volunteers for international test matches.  Keith works alongside practice nurse (Rachel) - attending games and treating injured players from both teams. 

Keith can regularly be seen working among the match day volunteer medical team which includes paramedics, team doctors and game day doctors.  He helps to assess and treat concussions and dislocations as well as treats players for facial and scalp lacerations. Having Rachel assist on the day proves valuable given they work to incredibly tight time frames (if injured players are not back on the field within 9 minutes they can not return to the game)!

Mr Mutimer also looks after players as needed when they sustain lacerations in training, which is often on a Sunday. His passion for the sport ensures treating players in his down time is never a chore.  Many of the players also visit Brighton Plastic Surgery for follow up care.

On the odd occasion that no one gets injured, Keith can be found enjoying the match!

Prestigious Award for Mr Mutimer

Friday, June 13, 2014

Mr Mutimer recently attended the Royal Australian College of Surgeons Scientific Congress in Singapore.

At this meeting Mr Mutimer received a very prestigious award.  Mr Mutimer was awarded the ESR Hughes Award - this award is designed to recognise distinguished contributions to surgery by Fellows of the College.  It was created in recognition of the outstanding contribution to surgery by Prof. Sir Edward Hughes. 


Mr Mutimer served on the Council as the Specialty Councillor for Plastic & Reconstruction Surgery for 9 years from 2003 to 2012, including 3 as Treasurer and 2 as Vice President.  Prior to joining the Council he was a Councillor with the Australian Society of Plastic Surgery from 1996, including a term as President in 2002.



Choosing a Plastic Surgeon

Monday, June 02, 2014

Deciding to undergo a cosmetic plastic surgery procedure is a major decision and one that should not be taken lightly.  There are many considerations including those related to selecting the surgeon performing the procedure to your individual circumstances and expectations:

When choosing a Plastic Surgeon:

  •           Of utmost importance: research and understand the surgeons qualifications and experience
  •           Check that the premises from which the surgeon operates is accredited
  •           Enquire as to other locations that the surgeon operates or hospitals he or she works or has worked
  •           Enquire how often the surgeon has performed the procedure you require
  •           Assess the surgeons willingness to answer any questions you may have
  •           Ensure realistic expectations and outcomes for the procedure are discussed and agreed
  •           Ask what you can expect before, during and after the procedure
  •           Understand procedure costs
  •           Ask around – often it is those closest to you who will recommend the best surgeon in your area

It is important to do your home work and ensure you choose a qualified specialist plastic surgeon.  We are advocates for our clients doing their own research however in selecting a surgeon and assessing their qualifications it is important our clients understand some basic terminology:

What is the difference between a Cosmetic Surgeon and a Specialist Plastic Surgeon?

The Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons website stipulates that “A Specialist Plastic Surgeon is a Commonwealth Government accredited plastic surgeon, trained and qualified to perform invasive cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in public and private hospitals, and accredited day surgeries. In Australia, the national Medical Board states that the “Specialist Plastic Surgeon” title can only be used by FRACS approved specialist surgeons in the recognised Specialty of Plastic Surgery.”

Why choose a specialist plastic surgeon?

Currently in Australia, it is legal for any doctor with a basic medical degree to perform surgery. Specialist Plastic Surgeons, on the other hand, have extensive surgical education and training including a minimum of 12 years medical and surgical education, with at least 5 years of specialist postgraduate training.

Mr Mutimer is a Specialist Plastic Surgeon based in Melbourne. 

Please check that your surgeon is a Specialist Plastic Surgeon by visiting: http://www.plasticsurgery.org.au/about-us/search/

Your skin cancer questions

Thursday, April 17, 2014

With summer over and many of us feeling just a teeny bit guilty about time spent in the sun (even with our sunscreen and cover ups) now is the perfect time to take stock of your skin and moles and get them checked.  Since its introduction MoleMap at Brighton Plastic Surgery has provided patients full body peace of mind when it comes to their skin and any areas of concern. 

We've collated a few of the most popular skin cancer questions patients raise and asked plastic surgeon Dr Ramin Shayan to share some insights:

  •  What’s the difference between a BCC and an SCC?

Firstly not all types of cancer are the same. BCC and SCC are the main category of skin cancers known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs).

A Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) is a growth within the basal cells of the skin, that give rise to the new skin cells that renew our skin as part of normal life. In this process, mature skin cells (keratinocytes) shed off the surface and are replaced by younger fresher cells beneath, that start as the basal layer. This type of skin cancer is essentially not able to spread  (a small group that do spread have been described as having <0.05% chance of spreading!!), however it does keep growing larger in the local area. Depending on the type of BCC, it may keep burrowing deeper. 

A Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is also an uncontrolled growth of skin cells, but this occurs in more mature layers of the skin. Depending on the type, these cancers may also spread if neglected, but is unlikely to do so if excised in a relatively timely fashion.

  • Why did my doctor say it was OK to wait a few months to have surgery – isn't it a cancer? 

The answer is that 'cancers ain't cancers'. That means, that just the word cancer is not a death-sentence. A cancer is simply a growth of cells that has lost the normal ability of the body's cells to sense when there is something wrong, and to switch it off. There are many different types of cancer, originating in many different organs. Whilst some cancers do carry a poor survival rate, generally, the non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) - BCC and SCC are among the better types of cancer to have if caught early. If a BCC or SCC is in the early stages, it is best to treat them in the early stages however there is no additional consequence if we treat these within 30 or so days.

  •  Are all skin cancers melanomas? And if my skin cancer is not a dangerous one - why bother to get it removed?

No, in fact most are not. BCCs and SCCs make up the vast majority of skin cancers in Australia however some melanomas may masquerade as BCCs or SCCs so it is important to get the specimen sent to a pathologist once it has been removed. If it does turn out to be a melanoma, there is a range of different treatment steps that must be undertaken, depending on the depth and other characteristics of the melanoma.

  •  Do skin cancers run in the family or is it because of the sun?

A good question - there is a lot we are yet to find out about the genetics of cancer.

Whilst there are some familial cancers, most skin cancers are due to exposure to the sun. Of course fair skinned people are more susceptible to sun damage and certainly one does inherit their skin type from their ancestors.  If there is a family history of skin cancer it is crucial to discuss this with your doctor.  

If you have any specific questions about skin cancer or would like to find out more about MoleMap - phone us on 03 9592 0522.

Spotlight on Neck Lift Surgery

Thursday, April 03, 2014

A neck lift is a procedure to tighten loose neck muscles and remove sagging skin to produce a firmer, more youthful appearance. Neck lift surgery is often completed in conjunction with a face lift.  This results in a more comprehensive rejuvenation of the neck and face.

A neck lift is generally recommended for adults 40+ who are experiencing issues with skin laxity and contour around the neckline.  Main reasons for this are due to advanced signs of ageing or major weight loss. 

What to expect with neck lift surgery?

Mr Mutimer will consult with you and review your full medical history and will discuss your particular neck issues and realistic expectations that can be achieved.  Neck lift surgery usually takes between 2-3 hours (longer if it is being performed in conjunction with another procedure). It is performed as an inpatient procedure under general anaesthesia.

Benefits of neck lift surgery include:

  • Removal of sagging or loose skin that forms under the chin
  • Removal of fat from under chin (referred to as a double chin) and from the neck
  • Correcting lines that appear on the neck as skin starts to sag
  • Restoring a more youthful appearance to the neck and chin

Please feel free to submit a confidential enquiry through our website to find out more about Neck Lift Surgery or any other surgery offered by Dr Mutimer.


Worried about a mole?

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Mole Mapping SKin Cancer Checks

We are pleased to announce that we now offer MoleMap – one of the most trusted and thorough mole mapping technologies in the world.  With skin cancer being so prevalent in Australia (current statistics suggest 2 in 3 people will develop it in their lifetime), it is becoming increasingly important to get regular mole checks and monitor your skin for changes.

MoleMap is a very comprehensive mole scanning technology that offers full body peace of mind.  It can detect skin cancer early by using Total Body Photography, Dermoscopy (magnified inspection of skin lesions) and Sequential Dermoscopy (monitoring of moles over time).  Basically, all medical speak aside, it is the only service that uses these 3 requirements along with specialist dermatologist diagnosis as standard for all patients.

The procedure is non-invasive and does not hurt.  It is also safe for pregnant women.  Your mole mapping will be performed by our skin cancer specialist who will undertake a full body MoleMap, which includes a thorough examination of your skin, total body photography and an in-depth analysis and imaging of your moles to create a baseline of what’s normal for you.  The whole experience takes about an hour.  Mr Mutimer is also available for follow up consultation should your skin assessment show any abnormalities that require further checking by a specialist.

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How much does MoleMap cost?

The cost varies according to the type of procedure you have:

- Initial Full Body Mole Map $375

The one hour initial consultation is an extremely thorough procedure and is designed to provide you with accurate and timely diagnoses of all your moles. 

- Follow Up Mole Mapping $255 - $320

Repeating the MoleMap procedure on a regular basis (e.g. yearly) enables our expert dermatologists to observe structural changes in all of your moles over a period of time. 

- Spot Check  $140 (1-3 lesions diagnosed)

This appointment is designed specifically for you to get rapid and accurate diagnosis by a specialist dermatologist on any specific moles that you are worried about.
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You can find out more or book an appointment by phoning Mole Map directly on 1 800 665 362. Their friendly staff will assist you with your questions and can also book an appointment at Brighton Plastic Surgery on your behalf. The service is currently available at Brighton Plastic Surgery every second Wednesday.

BPS welcomes new surgeon - Dr Ramin Shayan

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Brighton Plastic Surgery is pleased to welcome a new surgeon to the practice. Dr Ramin Shayan, a Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeon, will be working with the team at Brighton Plastic Surgery seeing patients with skin lesions.

 Dr Shayan worked with Mr Mutimer during his specialist training and knows the practice well.  He also currently works at The Alfred, St Vincent’s and Royal Melbourne Hospitals.

Dr Shayan received his medical degree from the University of Melbourne in 2001 and is a Fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. He completed his PhD in the molecular biology of cancer spread and lymphedema.  Dr Shayan is very involved with a research lab at The O’Brien Institute investigating Regenerative Science. 

Dr Shayan is now accepting new patients with skin lesions and is accredited in the day surgery so removal of lesions can be attended promptly should this be required.

CONTACT US now should you wish to find out more or book an appointment with Dr Shayan.

Taking on the Eureka Climb

Monday, December 02, 2013

On Sunday 17th November, 12 of our team (3 teams of 4) took on the challenging Eureka Climb (www.eurekaclimb.com.au)

Eureka Climb is Australia's biggest vertical race held at one of the world's tallest residential buildings, Eureka Tower in Southbank, Melbourne.  The climb involved ascending 1642 steps to level 88 of the building (Eureka Skydeck - the highest observation deck in the Southern Hemisphere).  Eureka Climb is in the top 20 (amount of stairs) of stair climbs in the world and is host to an Elite Race for some of Australia's best stair climbers.

The event raised much needed funds for key charity partners Interplast & Whitelion, who are both committed to helping disadvantaged young people. 

We at BPS are very involved with Interplast (www.interplast.org.au), with Keith being a member of the board (and having done numerous surgical trips) and several of our staff currently volunteering their time on overseas surgical trips in the Asia Pacific Region.

As part of this event, our teams raised $7,785 to help rebuild young lives.  


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Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) treatment

Well summer is almost over and what a  ..

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treatment for excessive sweating

Well summer is almost over and what a warm one it has been.  For some people (approximately 1% of the population) the typical thing we like to grumble about during the warmer months (sweating a bit too much) is a year round complaint.

Excessive sweating (hyperhidrosis) is a condition that affects both men and women equally. More extreme cases of hyperhidrosis can be quite debilitating – resulting in the need to change outfits multiple times a day, limiting social and work life opportunities and may cause low self-esteem. The condition is not limited to the warmer summer months when the body naturally has to work a little harder to cool itself down.

Hyperhidrosis is most common on the palms of the hands, soles of the feet and in the under arm area. Our body sweats as a natural cooling mechanism, hyperhidrosis occurs when one’s body produces more sweat than is necessary.  

There are several excessive sweating treatment options available however before a treatment plan is developed medical causes must always be ruled out.  One of the most popular treatment options for excessive sweating is injections into the area, which reduce excessive sweating dramatically, targeting the specific glands that are the source of the problem.

These injections work by blocking the chemical signals from nerves that stimulate sweat production. When the signal stops, so too does the excessive sweating. This treatment is most common in the under arm area and to treat excessive sweating of the forehead.  Treatment is very effective – usually resulting in significant reduction in sweating that can last up to 6 months from just one treatment.

Treatment for excessive sweating at Brighton Plastic Surgery is performed by Mr Mutimer in his consulting rooms.  To find out more or to book a consultation submit an enquiry via our site or phone 03 9592 0522.

Dr Ramin Shayan appointed Consultant Plastic Surgeon to the Victorian Melanoma Service

Dr Ramin Shayan has recently been appointed by ..

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Dr Ramin Shayan has recently been appointed by the Victorian Melanoma Service as one of their Consultant Plastic Surgeons.

Located at The Alfred Hospital, the Victorian Melanoma Service (VMS) is one of Australia’s largest multidisciplinary treatment services for melanoma.  It provides treatment for patients who have a biopsy proven melanoma. The clinic is accessed via a referral from a GP or medical professional.

The clinic has a number of specialists who work together to diagnose, treat and follow up on melanoma patients. Medical professionals who work at the VMS include those who specialise in anatomical pathology, dermatology, plastic surgery, general surgery, medical oncology and radiation.

Dr Shayan has specialised in melanoma and skin lesion removal at Brighton Plastic Surgery since joining the practice in 2014. This is in addition to his pioneering work in the treatment of lymphoedema.

“It is exciting to join such an expert team to ensure delivery of gold standard, cutting edge assessment and treatment of often complex melanoma patients” said Dr Shayan.To find out more about the Victorian Melanoma Service visit Alfred Health.

Inaugural Friends Of Interplast Dinner

The Inaugural Friends of Interplast (https://w ..

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The Inaugural Friends of Interplast fundraising dinner was recently held at The Carousel in Albert Park.

The dinner aims to raise much needed funds for Interplast’s work in repairing bodies and rebuilding lives across the Asia Pacific Region.

As President of Interplast, Mr Mutimer spoke at the event and is pictured below alongside recently announced ambassador, and rising AFLW star, Jess Hosking.

The evening was a huge success with funds raised being used to create the 'Friends of Interplast' Program. This will involve sending a surgical team overseas where approximately 30- 50 patients will receive life changing surgery, as well as opportunities for Interplast volunteers to build capacity and provide ongoing training.

To find out more about Interplast or to donate visit: www.interplast.org.au