Melbourne Plastic Surgery Blog

Melbourne Plastic Surgery Blog

Eureka Climb 2015

Thursday, November 19, 2015

On Sunday 15th November 2015 we had four teams who successfully took on the challenging Eureka Climb (www.eurekaclimb.com.au) including our "Corporate Cup" team (yes, mad running!) who won the Corporate Cup!

Eureka Climb is Australia's biggest vertical race held at one of the world's tallest residential buildings, Eureka Tower in Southbank, Melbourne.  The climb involved ascending 1642 steps to level 88 of the building.  Eureka Climb is in the top 20 (amount of stairs) of stair climbs in the world and is host to an Elite Race for some of Australia's best stair climbers.

We are delighted to have raised over $16,000 for key charity partners including Interplast - where funds will go towards changing the lives of people who do not currently have the capacity to do so themselves - in this case children and adults who will receive free, life changing surgery.

A huge thanks to all who supported us.  Best start training for next year!






Dr Shayan appointed Director of the O’Brien Research Institute

Monday, September 07, 2015

Dr Ramin Shayan has been appointed the Director of the O’Brien Research Institute at St. Vincent’s Institute for Medical Research, Australia’s only dedicated plastic surgery research institute. 

The research conducted at the O’Brien Institute focuses on using stem cells and molecular biology for regenerative surgery and tissue engineering. The disease focus includes tissue engineering for breast reconstruction, lymphoedema, and radiation injury after breast cancer – the diseases that result from cancer treatment – the so called “disease of cancer survivorship”.

Interplast visit to Sri Lanka

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

Mr Mutimer has had a long term association with Interplast and in Feb this year was fortunate enough to undertake another Interplast trip overseas, this time to Sri Lanka.  The College of Surgeons in Sri Lanka requested Interplast assist them with the plastic surgery curriculum program development. 

During his week long visit, Mr Mutimer met with the President of the College of Surgeons and also spent time working with the current plastic surgery trainees and members of the college who are directly involved in the development of the surgical training program.

Pictured below is Mr Mutimer along with Dr Dulip Perera (second from left), a plastic surgeon from Sri Lanka who has had a long standing relationship with Interplast and the development of plastic surgery in his country. 

Following Mr Mutimer's  visit he was advised that he was nominated and accepted for honorary fellowship from the College of Surgeons Sri Lanka - which honours his contribution to the Plastic Surgery fraternity in Sri Lanka. This prestigious award is the highest given to a foreign surgeon by the college. 

Celebrating triumph over adversity

Friday, June 05, 2015
Recently the BPS team were fortunate to have the opportunity to attend "The Brighton Lunch" - a fundraising event held by Rotary. Rotary are a long standing supporter of Interplast and this lunch was held to support numerous charities, including Interplast.

Dr Mutimer spoke at the event alongside Interplast CEO, Prue Ingram.  Interplast ambassador Turia Pitt also spoke - her inspirational words highlighting that burns are still a very big issue in many countries, and how she would not have survived had her particular situation happened to her in a developing country.  Turia's work with Interplast has bought an understanding of the effects burns can have on entire communities and the impact one surgery has, not just for that person, but their whole families livelihood.  

In his address, Mr Mutimer outlined  the importance of the fundraising efforts for Interplast and the vital role they play in allowing Interplast to provide life changing surgery today, and build sustainable health systems for tomorrow.  Funds collected help surgical teams enter countries to assist local surgeons, and train them so that they are able to perform more surgeries themselves, thus improving the quality of, and saving lives.

For more information or to make a donation - visit the Interplast website.


Mr Mutimer and Interplast CEO Prue Ingram


Interplast ambassador Turia Pitt - with BPS staff Charlotte (left) and Simone (right)


 The BPS team

Breast Implant Study

Tuesday, November 11, 2014

On 11/11/14 The Herald Sun Newspaper reported on a recent breast implant study - linking breast implants to breast cancer.  

 The Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons have issued the following media release in response to this study:


 

Interplast visit to Bhutan

Monday, September 22, 2014
Mr Mutimer recently travelled to Bhutan as part of a needs assessment team for Interplast.  Landing at the worlds 4th most dangerous airport made for some nervous flying but the team thankfully landed safely. Interplast currently do not run any programs in Bhutan, so the purpose of the trip was to establish whether an Interplast program would be useful.

Bhutan has expressed an interest in having an Interplast program in their country, not only for the valuable and life-changing operative procedures Interplast perform, but to take advantage of the teachings and knowledge to be learned from Interplast Surgeons, ensuring that the medical community of Bhutan can manage and sustain the work of Interplast, long after they are gone.  The plan would be to upskill doctors, nurses and allied health staff in reconstructive plastic surgery. Hospitals in Bhutan are quite well set up but the services offered are very basic in comparison to Australia.

Many other organizations have “camps” which fly in, operate and fly out but Bhutan is looking for training so that their doctors have the capacity to manage injuries throughout the year, not just when international help is present.

Interplast would likely initially assist with hand surgery and small general plastic surgery.  There is a strong need for both of these sustainable, entry level surgeries. Mr Mutimer witnessed a patient who had been mauled by a bear whilst picking mushrooms in a field - so it goes without saying that the presenting cases in Bhutan would be quite varied compared to most of the cases Mr Mutimer treats in Australia.

No visit to a country like Bhutan is complete without sampling the local fare - Keith found the food fascinating, extremely colourful and very different to Australian cuisine. He was taken out for dinner by a group of local doctors to an Italian restaurant who proceeded to run out of cheese. The solution? Close the restaurant! Not one to go hungry the group decided instead to dine on much enjoyed local fare.  Keith found Bhutan a beautiful country with magnificent countryside (a hikers dream) - he hopes to return one day to hike and explore the country further.

For more information on Interplast visit: https://www.interplast.org.au



Melbourne Rebels Rugby Union Team

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Mr Mutimer regularly volunteers as a Plastic Surgeon with the Melbourne Rebels, attending their home games at AAMI Park. He also volunteers for international test matches.  Keith works alongside practice nurse (Rachel) - attending games and treating injured players from both teams. 

Keith can regularly be seen working among the match day volunteer medical team which includes paramedics, team doctors and game day doctors.  He helps to assess and treat concussions and dislocations as well as treats players for facial and scalp lacerations. Having Rachel assist on the day proves valuable given they work to incredibly tight time frames (if injured players are not back on the field within 9 minutes they can not return to the game)!

Mr Mutimer also looks after players as needed when they sustain lacerations in training, which is often on a Sunday. His passion for the sport ensures treating players in his down time is never a chore.  Many of the players also visit Brighton Plastic Surgery for follow up care.

On the odd occasion that no one gets injured, Keith can be found enjoying the match!

Prestigious Award for Mr Mutimer

Friday, June 13, 2014

Mr Mutimer recently attended the Royal Australian College of Surgeons Scientific Congress in Singapore.

At this meeting Mr Mutimer received a very prestigious award.  Mr Mutimer was awarded the ESR Hughes Award - this award is designed to recognise distinguished contributions to surgery by Fellows of the College.  It was created in recognition of the outstanding contribution to surgery by Prof. Sir Edward Hughes. 


Mr Mutimer served on the Council as the Specialty Councillor for Plastic & Reconstruction Surgery for 9 years from 2003 to 2012, including 3 as Treasurer and 2 as Vice President.  Prior to joining the Council he was a Councillor with the Australian Society of Plastic Surgery from 1996, including a term as President in 2002.



Choosing a Plastic Surgeon

Monday, June 02, 2014

Deciding to undergo a cosmetic plastic surgery procedure is a major decision and one that should not be taken lightly.  There are many considerations including those related to selecting the surgeon performing the procedure to your individual circumstances and expectations:

When choosing a Plastic Surgeon:

  •           Of utmost importance: research and understand the surgeons qualifications and experience
  •           Check that the premises from which the surgeon operates is accredited
  •           Enquire as to other locations that the surgeon operates or hospitals he or she works or has worked
  •           Enquire how often the surgeon has performed the procedure you require
  •           Assess the surgeons willingness to answer any questions you may have
  •           Ensure realistic expectations and outcomes for the procedure are discussed and agreed
  •           Ask what you can expect before, during and after the procedure
  •           Understand procedure costs
  •           Ask around – often it is those closest to you who will recommend the best surgeon in your area

It is important to do your home work and ensure you choose a qualified specialist plastic surgeon.  We are advocates for our clients doing their own research however in selecting a surgeon and assessing their qualifications it is important our clients understand some basic terminology:

What is the difference between a Cosmetic Surgeon and a Specialist Plastic Surgeon?

The Australian Society of Plastic Surgeons website stipulates that “A Specialist Plastic Surgeon is a Commonwealth Government accredited plastic surgeon, trained and qualified to perform invasive cosmetic and reconstructive surgery in public and private hospitals, and accredited day surgeries. In Australia, the national Medical Board states that the “Specialist Plastic Surgeon” title can only be used by FRACS approved specialist surgeons in the recognised Specialty of Plastic Surgery.”

Why choose a specialist plastic surgeon?

Currently in Australia, it is legal for any doctor with a basic medical degree to perform surgery. Specialist Plastic Surgeons, on the other hand, have extensive surgical education and training including a minimum of 12 years medical and surgical education, with at least 5 years of specialist postgraduate training.

Mr Mutimer is a Specialist Plastic Surgeon based in Melbourne. 

Please check that your surgeon is a Specialist Plastic Surgeon by visiting: http://www.plasticsurgery.org.au/about-us/search/

Your skin cancer questions

Thursday, April 17, 2014

With summer over and many of us feeling just a teeny bit guilty about time spent in the sun (even with our sunscreen and cover ups) now is the perfect time to take stock of your skin and moles and get them checked.  Since its introduction MoleMap at Brighton Plastic Surgery has provided patients full body peace of mind when it comes to their skin and any areas of concern. 

We've collated a few of the most popular skin cancer questions patients raise and asked plastic surgeon Dr Ramin Shayan to share some insights:

  •  What’s the difference between a BCC and an SCC?

Firstly not all types of cancer are the same. BCC and SCC are the main category of skin cancers known as non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs).

A Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) is a growth within the basal cells of the skin, that give rise to the new skin cells that renew our skin as part of normal life. In this process, mature skin cells (keratinocytes) shed off the surface and are replaced by younger fresher cells beneath, that start as the basal layer. This type of skin cancer is essentially not able to spread  (a small group that do spread have been described as having <0.05% chance of spreading!!), however it does keep growing larger in the local area. Depending on the type of BCC, it may keep burrowing deeper. 

A Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) is also an uncontrolled growth of skin cells, but this occurs in more mature layers of the skin. Depending on the type, these cancers may also spread if neglected, but is unlikely to do so if excised in a relatively timely fashion.

  • Why did my doctor say it was OK to wait a few months to have surgery – isn't it a cancer? 

The answer is that 'cancers ain't cancers'. That means, that just the word cancer is not a death-sentence. A cancer is simply a growth of cells that has lost the normal ability of the body's cells to sense when there is something wrong, and to switch it off. There are many different types of cancer, originating in many different organs. Whilst some cancers do carry a poor survival rate, generally, the non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) - BCC and SCC are among the better types of cancer to have if caught early. If a BCC or SCC is in the early stages, it is best to treat them in the early stages however there is no additional consequence if we treat these within 30 or so days.

  •  Are all skin cancers melanomas? And if my skin cancer is not a dangerous one - why bother to get it removed?

No, in fact most are not. BCCs and SCCs make up the vast majority of skin cancers in Australia however some melanomas may masquerade as BCCs or SCCs so it is important to get the specimen sent to a pathologist once it has been removed. If it does turn out to be a melanoma, there is a range of different treatment steps that must be undertaken, depending on the depth and other characteristics of the melanoma.

  •  Do skin cancers run in the family or is it because of the sun?

A good question - there is a lot we are yet to find out about the genetics of cancer.

Whilst there are some familial cancers, most skin cancers are due to exposure to the sun. Of course fair skinned people are more susceptible to sun damage and certainly one does inherit their skin type from their ancestors.  If there is a family history of skin cancer it is crucial to discuss this with your doctor.  

If you have any specific questions about skin cancer or would like to find out more about MoleMap - phone us on 03 9592 0522.

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Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update – Wednesday 29th April 2020

Brighton Plastic Surgery (http://www.plasticsu ..

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Brighton Plastic Surgery would like to reassure our clients that our practice remains open at this time. Please note that restrictions on the types of surgeries our plastic surgeons can perform continue to be in place.

Currently we’re treating skin cancer, urgent skin lesions and trauma patients only. In doing so we continue to adhere to all Health Department Guidelines to ensure the safety of patients and our staff.  We’re performing  consults via telehealth wherever possible.Those that are required to attend the practice will be asked to adhere to strict processes and will be advised of these prior to your appointment.

Whilst we aren’t able to perform cosmetic related procedures at this time we are still taking enquiries so encourage you to get in touch if you’d like to discuss a future surgery.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update – Monday 30 March 2020

As we continue to closely monitor and respond  ..

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As we continue to closely monitor and respond to the current COVID-19 situation, we’d like to advise of the following changes to our business operations as of 30th March 2020.

We remain open, however our surgeons are currently only seeing patients for skin cancers and trauma. As a result, our practice may operate on limited hours some days.

Wherever possible we have moved to telehealth for other appointments.   We are not able to undertake any wrinkle reduction or cosmetic treatments until further notice, we are however taking bookings for when it is safe to resume.

For urgent (trauma) cases arising after hours – we’ve added after hour surgeon contact details to our main office phone. If you call and our practice is closed, you’ll receive further instruction. Please note that contacting surgeons out of hours is only for urgent cases.

We thank you for your understanding and patience as we navigate these challenging times.

Please follow us on Facebook to stay abreast of any new developments as we’ll post timely updates there, and on our website. As always if you have any questions or concerns please call the practice on 03 9592 0522.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update – Tuesday 24th March 2020

The team at Brighton Plastic Surgery would lik ..

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The team at Brighton Plastic Surgery would like to assure clients that we continue to closely monitor the unfolding COVID-19 situation and are implementing all necessary safety measures and closely following Health Department Guidelines.

Our practice continues to operate at this time however many changes are in place. Additional measures have been implemented to protect our patients and staff at this uncertain time. Some of these include:

  • Hand wash stations: you’ll find these at our entrance. All people entering our premises are required to thoroughly wash hands on arrival, and upon leaving.
  • Phone appointments – it is not always possible, however where we’re able we are now providing phone consultations, limiting the number of people passing through our practice whilst still providing important patient care and guidance.
  • Limited number of people in our practice at any given time– at this time only essential support people may attend a client’s appointment.  Please be mindful that as a support person you may be asked to wait in your car. If you are attending an appointment on your own, you may also be asked to wait in your car until we are ready for your appointment. The seating capacity in the reception area is deliberately very limited
  • Cashless payments – We’ve moved to cashless payments wherever possible.
If you are unwell you will not be able to attend the practice for your appointment. Please phone us and we will guide you in regard to your ongoing care.

If you have an upcoming appointment our staff will contact you to discuss how this will be managed for you.

We thank you for your understanding and patience as we navigate these challenging times.

Please follow us on Facebook to stay abreast of any new developments as we’ll post timely updates there, and on our website. As always if you have any questions or concerns please call the practice on 03 9592 0522.